Google +

We’ll use G+ to share ideas about readings, course design, and other things that interest us: Link

Class Notes & Prompts

Class Notes & Prompts

Week 6

Reflect on your composing process: what do you do to write the G+ responses or write in another context? What questions come up as you try to compose? Think of a text you recently produced and do some deconstruction work: attempt to recount all that surrounds and informs that piece of writing–what are the spaces, materials, resources, etc that are going on in a scene of writing for you? 

We could compare our experiences to the students in Nelson’s article and think about the implications for teaching.


Week 4

LaTex

Audrey Watters “The Weaponization of Education Data”

Student example work from English 130

Wilcox Syllabus and Rationale


Week 3

Chapter 3 from Situated Learning

In pairs/trio

We’ll choose one of the “cases of apprenticeship” and talk through how people learn to be a member of that particular community. How do they learn to become a participant in this group? What enables the learning? What gets in the way if anything?

Then, think about principles of learning that we could consider from your chosen example. How might this inform the teaching of writing?

Together: Choose a concept/idea you find interesting from this text (for example, perhaps you are intrigued by the concept of “identity” that they talk about in various places in this text or the term “practice”…): what does it make you think about in terms of your own learning, or our work in this class or other classes, or how you might structure a classroom or activities related to the teaching of writing?

 Wells

The Gordon Wells piece comes from Vygotskian perspectives on literacy Research. I like it because Wells does a nice job of summarizing Vygotsky’s ideas when you don’t have time to read Vygotsky. And he hits on so many practices that inform our writing program.

Our goal is to (again) pull out principles of learning (and teaching and classrooms and what counts as activity) to consider them—what would these ideas look like in course design?

Where are we after 3 weeks of Dewey, Lave & Wenger, and Wells? What principles of learning or educational design could we use in our design work.

If time:

What kinds of classes are you going to design?


Week 2

Situated Learning

QW: Think of something you’ve learned to do pretty well outside of school–gardening, baking, playing guitar, knitting. How did you learn to do that? What are the spaces, materials, people, activities that surround that thing?

Share with a partner: let’s pull out some conditions for learning together. If you had to generalize from your 2-3 specific examples, what would you say are the conditions for learning? 

conceptions of practice & participation

Scribner and Cole: By practice, we mean a recurrent, goal-directed sequence of activities using a particular technology and particular systems of knowledge. A practice consists of: technology, knowledge, and skills (236). Practice always refers to socially developed and patterned ways of using technology and knowledge to accomplish tasks.

Wenger: Practice is always social practice. Practice: Doing in a historical and social context that give structure and meaning to what we do. as soon as members have access to the practice, they find out what counts

“…we have begun to analyze the changing forms of participation and identity of persons who engage in sustained participation in a community of practice: from entrance as a newcomer, through becoming an old-timer with respect to newcomers, to a point when those newcomers themselves become old-timers. Rather than a teacher/learner dyad, this points to a richly diverse field of essential actors and, with it, other forms of relationships of participation” (Lave & Wenger 56).    preview19

Let’s work with small groups working through some definitions/ideas about “situated learning” and “legitimate peripheral participation.” Some things to help: your quick write, re-read 34-37, here’s a Link to quick and fast key claims for Vygotsky, Google, etc…

Also, try some summary work and pull a key quote from these sections (we’ll jigsaw this reading):

  • 29-34 (Lumi, Jo, Alondra)
  • 34-37 (Jazelle, Jasmine)
  • 39-42 (William, Jenna, Isaiah)
  • 52-54 (Sophy, Jesse, Carolyn)

Then, teams draw/use quotes/map concepts (LPP, participation…)

 

 

 


Chapter 3 from Situated Learning

In groups:

1. Choose one of the “cases of apprenticeship” and talk through how people learn to be a member of that particular community. How do they learn to become a participant in this group? What enables the learning? What gets in the way if anything?

Then, think about principles of learning that we could consider from your chosen example. How might this inform 30, 130, or the teaching of writing?

If time:

2. Choose a concept/idea you find interesting from this text (for example, perhaps you are intrigued by the concept of “identity” that they talk about in various places in this text or the term “practice”…); use the index and search for places in the text where they talk about this concept.

Then, try to apply this is some way: what does it make you think about in terms of your own learning, or our work in this class or other classes, or how you might structure a classroom or activities related to the teaching of writing?

share out with the class.


Week 1

Dewey

pull out some quotes/passages.

What does it say? Why does it matter?

What is he pushing against?

From this we can pull out principles for class design and/or learning.