Make Cycles

graphic of class routinesYou can find our current Make Cycles here and on the Make Cycles page.

Calendar

September 2020
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
August 31, 2020 September 1, 2020 September 2, 2020

All day: Discover: trace your literacies

September 3, 2020 September 4, 2020 September 5, 2020 September 6, 2020
September 7, 2020

All day: Read and Annotate in Perusall

September 8, 2020 September 9, 2020 September 10, 2020 September 11, 2020

All day: Write summary & memo

September 12, 2020 September 13, 2020

All day: Cycle 1 Make

September 14, 2020 September 15, 2020 September 16, 2020

All day: Discover: trace your quantified self

September 17, 2020 September 18, 2020 September 19, 2020 September 20, 2020

All day: Read and Annotate in Perusall

September 21, 2020 September 22, 2020 September 23, 2020 September 24, 2020 September 25, 2020

All day: Write summary & memo

September 26, 2020 September 27, 2020

All day: Cycle 2 Make

September 28, 2020 September 29, 2020 September 30, 2020

All day: Discover: literacy interviews

October 1, 2020 October 2, 2020 October 3, 2020 October 4, 2020

All day: Read and Annotate in Perusall

Make Cycle 2

Make Cycle 2

Weeks 4 & 5: Sept 14-27

photo of robotsMake Cycle 2: Our Quantified Selves 

We’ll use this cycle to think about how selves are tracked. I’m fascinated by the self tracking trends and wonder what we gain from knowing so much about ourselves. Here’s a quote from one of the articles, “Big Mother is Watching You,” that we’ll read this make cycle:

Still more [devices] will track focus in the workplace, compliance to prescriptions from physical therapists, exposure to sunlight, and our ability to conceive. The breadth of devices and their utility is so vast that it’s proven difficult to name the trend: Quantified Self, Internet of Things, Everything-Tracking — nothing quite fits. The thesis that unites them, however, is clear: The future will be quantified.

What do you track? Who tracks you? How can we claim more control over the constructions of our digital identities? How are our literacy practices connected to our quantified selves? In other words, how does our use of social media sites, school sites, apps, construct a quantified self(ves) and construct digital lives? 

We’ll kick off by noticing your quantified self: What do you keep track of: Your followers? Your likes? Your steps walked? Your workouts? Your heart rate? Your sleep? Your gas mileage? Your hours worked? The number of books read? Your “top 9” instagrams and snapchats? 

Tasks in a Nutshell (longer descriptions below)

  • By Wednesday, Sept 16: Discover: Trace your quantified self (see longer prompts below)
  • By Sunday, Sept 20: Read: two articles (annotate/comment in Perusall)
    1. Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris’ “A Guide for Resisting EdTech: The Case Against TurnitIn” AND
    2. Choose one of these:
      • Audrey Watters’ “Building Anti-Surveillance EdTech” OR
      • Shea Swauger’s  “Our Bodies Encoded: Algorithmic Test Proctoring in Higher Education
  • By Friday, Sept 25: Write: Summary of one of the articles and Memo: the quantified self (post in Currents)
  • By Sunday, Sept 27: Make: create an artifact that represents the ideas in this make cycle about the quantified self. Suggestions below, but totally up to you.

Full explanation of tasks:

By Wednesday, Sept 16

Discover: 

Trace your quantified self: to prep for this activity skim “Big Mother is Watching You” and explore the Quantified Self website. I think both of those things will give you some context for what we’re up to, so I think you’ll find it helpful to take 20 minutes to look over. Some ideas for discovering/tracing your quantified self:

    • Google your name in a web search. Perhaps try in incognito mode too: every browser has an option for this if you Google “how do I use incognito mode in X browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc)” Are there differences in the results from when you Google as yourself and when you Google in incognito mode?
    • Check My Activity in google
    • Check your screen time on your phone. The amount of time spent on various apps on your phone. The stats in your activity or health apps. 
    • Do you notice likes in Instagram or other social media? Number of followers?
    • Do you keep track of your sleep? Your workouts? Do you go into detail on workouts like keeping track of splits on a run?
      • I was diagnosed with AFib last year, so I keep careful track of my heart rate all the time. My apple watch has my heart rate right on the front; it’s a strange thing to know your heart rate all the time. Are there health things you keep track of? How?
    • What about school data? Do you keep track of scores, grades, etc?
    • Other ideas? Your gas mileage? Your hours worked? The number of books read? Your “top 9” instagrams and snapchats?

Ultimately, choose some things that you track and collect some data to share in our Currents Community (similar to what we did with our literacy tracings).


By Sunday, Sept 20:

Read:

Two articles (annotate/comment in Perusall)

  1. Jesse Stommel and Sean Michael Morris’ “A Guide for Resisting EdTech: The Case Against TurnitIn” AND
  2. Choose one of these:
    • Audrey Watters’ “Building Anti-Surveillance EdTech” OR
    • Shea Swauger’s  “Our Bodies Encoded: Algorithmic Test Proctoring in Higher Education

By Friday, Sept 25:

Write: 

  • Summary: choose one of the articles we read for this week and write a short summary of the texts. Include some quotes you find interesting. (We’ll be using these summaries and quotes in a piece of writing later this semester, so I’m hoping keeping track will be helpful along the way).
  • Memo: the quantified self. I’m hoping this informal writing provides an opportunity to reflect on your digital self. The article “Big Mother is Watching You” could serve as a kind of “mentor text,” fot this memo meaning that the tone and structure (more like a blog) could be interesting to riff off of. Notice, for example, how she begins the article by discussing her experience with tracking sleep. So, use this Memo to think about what you track and reflect on why: what do you track and how do you use this information? What did you learn by trying to keep track or discover your quantified self?

By Sunday, Sept 27:

Make: 

  • An informal blog (the Big Mother opening could be a model for getting started on a blog post): reflections on your quantified self. Perhaps expland or revise the Memo you wrote for our writing this week.
  • Another blog idea: You could compare what your school data says about you and what your school data leaves out? You might consider thinking through all the stats from your college experience: how many tests, how many classes attended (and missed), how many grades, how many hours working or studying? And then what is not accounted for in these numbers: friendships, commutes, homesickness, new places visited. How might you represent the full college experience? Perhaps stats on one side of a page and film or images on the other? Perhaps try out Piktochart?  Or Adobe Spark? You could represent these competing stats/reality in a series of memes (“what people think I do vs what I really do”)
  • Use the Data Detox kit and then write a reflection on the process.
  • An infographic (like the Quantify Yourself chart in the Big Mother article). Piktochart could be a great resource for this. You could then add a short piece of writing to expand on the chart: what does your data explain and not explain about your quantified self? 
  • Watch The Internet’s Own Boy and write a reflection
  • A short film: alternating some day-in-the-life style video perhaps with some narrative and images from you. I would keep this under 3 minutes. And I would compose a film, not simply talk to a webcam. 
  • A piece of art
  • A game: design a gaming experience for us that immerses the player into a quantified self. You might even use a site like Super Better to create your game.
  • Slam poetry or original song
  • Some other cool idea you have

Share links, upload images, or write responses in our Currents Community in the category Make Cycle 2: Makes. You’ll also write a brief reflection about the make: what was your intention with this make? what were you trying to convey? what worked? what didn’t?